Tasmania

Tasmanian Branch Committee Members

  • Tasmanian Branch President +

    Dr John Paul Cumming CPSS
    Director, GeoEnvironmental Solutions
    86 Queen St
    Sandy Bay Tas 7005
    Phone: +61 3 6223 1839
    Email: jcumming@geosolutions.net.au
  • Tasmanian Branch Vice President +

  • Tasmanian Branch Secretary +

    Luke Taylor

    Email: ltaylor@agassist.net.au
  • Tasmanian Branch Treasurer +

    Robyn Doyle
    GeoEnvironmental Solutions
    86 Queen St
    Sandy Bay Tas 7005
    Phone: +61 3 6223 1839
    Email: rdoyle@geosolutions.net.au
  • Tasmanian Branch Committee members +

    Richard Doyle, Suresh Panta and Mark Downie
  • 1

About the Tasmanian State Soil

tas ferrosolFerrosols are deep, well structured soils with a red or red-brown colour.  In Tasmania they have formed mainly from the weathering of basalt, a volcanic rock extruded as lava by numerous small volcanoes in northern Tasmania some 10-50 million years ago.  This means that Ferrosols are relatively old soils in Tasmania.  Consequently, the basalt has had quite a long time to weather, which explains why these soils are so deep, with usually more than 1 m to unweathered rock.

In many places, profiles are several meters deep.  The long period of weathering also helps to explain the red colour of Ferrosols. Basalt is a rock that is rich in iron. As the basalt weathers, the iron it contains is oxidised, in the same way that roofing iron rusts when left exposed to the elements.

The name Ferrosol comes from “ferrum”, the Latin term for iron. To be classed as a Ferrosol, a soil has to contain at least 5% free iron oxides.  Another name for Ferrosols is krasnozem, which in Russian means “red soil” or “red land”. Some of Tasmania’s Ferrosols in the colder, wetter, more elevated, inland regions around Tewkesbury and Ridgley, are not as red as those closer to the coast.

The cooler and wetter climate keeps more of the iron in the form of goethite, which has a yellower hue than the redder haematite found in coastal Ferrosols.  Red to brown, acid, strongly structured clay soils (50-70% clay) ranging in depth from less than 1 m to over 7 m.  Their clay mineralogy is dominated by kaolin and iron and aluminium oxides, and this ensures that the soils have variable charge properties with low cation exchange capacity and usually a significant anion exchange capacity. Free iron oxide contents range from about 7 to 18% Fe.

TAS Branch

Dear Tasmanian Soil Science members and other interested parties,

The Tasmanian Branch cordially invites you to DIRT DRINKS.

This is a casual gathering of all interested parties to talk soils and soil science over a beverage at the Dr Syntax Hotel in Sandy Bay.  DIRT DRINKSwill be on as a regular event on the last Friday of the month from 5 to 7 pm in either the restaurant bar area or the beer garden outside.

Please pass this invitation on to your networks and to anyone you think may be interested.

Doctor Syntax    

Regards

Robyn

0409961116

Tasmanian Honour Board

YEAR PRESIDENT VICE PRESIDENT TREASURER SECRETARY
2015/2016 John Paul Cumming   Robyn Doyle Sarah Richards
2014/15 Chris Grose John Paul Cumming Robyn Doyle Sarah Richards
2013/14 Marcus Hardie Chris Grose John Paul Cumming Robyn Doyle
2012/13 Marcus Hardie Chris Grose John Paul Cumming Robyn Doyle
2011/12 Leigh Sparrow Steven Ives John Paul Cumming Robyn Doyle
2010/11 Leigh Sparrow Steven Ives John Paul Cumming Sam Rees
2009/10 Leigh Sparrow Steven Ives John Paul Cumming Sam Rees
2008/09 Richard Doyle Bill Cotching John Paul Cumming Lucy Burkitt
2007/08 Richard Doyle Bill Cotching John Paul Cumming Lucy Burkitt

Webmaster Login

Soil Science Australia

logo

Soil Science Australia is a not-for-profit organisation that serves as the peak body for soil scientists across Australia, and seeks to advance soil science in the professional, academic and technical fields.  It is a member of the International Union of Soil Sciences

 

Awards

Visit Awards Page or download application forms below

J.A. Prescott Medal of Soil Science

J.K. Taylor, OBE, Gold Medal in Soil Science

Australian Society of Soil Science Inc Publication Medal

C.G. Stephens PhD Award in Soil Science

L.J.H Teakle Award

Contacts

 Federal Office

  PO Box 737 Prospect East 5082

 0476 450 321

 office@soilscienceaustralia.org